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Author Topic: Enlarged lymph nodes under chin  (Read 15949 times)
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Thunder530
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« on: September 07, 2006, 07:47:15 PM »

Just wondering if anyone else has had a horse with enlarged lymph nodes under the chin.  My horse has been vaccinated and boostered for strangles and none of the other horses have enlarged nodes.  I have called my vet about it and we are having a hard time getting in to see him.  Since he is aware of the problem and it has been going on for 4-5 weeks with no change in size or severity I'm thinking it must be some type of infection.  I think if it were life threatening, my vet would get me right in - plus my horse doesn't have any other signs or symptoms of anything - no weight loss, no lethergy - nothing other than some sunburn.  Any thoughts?
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shogeboo
Guest
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2006, 03:19:48 PM »

Hi Thunder,
One query on Yahoo and Strangles was mentioned all over the place. Please get your horse checked ASAP. If your vet can't do it, get an emergency vet or other vet to come out.
Best wishes to you.
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Sherry in CA
Guest
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2006, 06:01:04 PM »

In 28 years of having horses, I consider myself lucky that I've never had a case of strangles.  This is through many horses AND I stable at a boarding place (hubby is manager), so there's certainly been opportunity.  I also do not vaccinate for it.

BUT....I have seen enlarged lymph nodes many times.  What I believe is happening is that often a horse will catch a cold virus, and not actually get sick.  If they are healthy otherwise, I think the lymph nodes sort "catch" the virus & contain it.  Usually the swellings go down eventually.  It IS smart to keep an eye on it; maybe even take their temp & note that.  Consider that strangles mostly will not improve & the swelling will eventually get larger & then break open.  If this isn't the case in 4-5 weeks, it's likely not strangles (which may be why your vet is not in a hurry).  If you're still worried, it can't hurt (cept your pocketbook) to call in another vet just in case.
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ppr2glory
Guest
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2006, 10:38:32 AM »

Oh gosh Sherry not another disagreement!- Our mare had strangles- her nodes swelled up but never broke open and she didn't get any sicker than a very low grade temp and a little lethargic- might not even have noticed except the younger horses in the barn were really really sick and draining pus all over...we got out of there quick. Older horses (she was 12 then) might have stronger immune systems and have been exposed somethine in the past? She was a brood mare so maybe she had been vaccinated before for it too.
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Sherry in CA
Guest
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2006, 11:02:23 PM »

No, no....I actually don't disagree with you, LOL!!!  I suppose it IS possible that some horses with good immune systems don't get "full-blown" symptoms.  BECAUSE I've not had to deal with a case personally, I have not done extensive reading on it.  I DO think she should call the vet if this persists much longer than another week or so.  A whole months is longer than I've ever seen the swelling.
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possegirl
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« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2006, 11:59:19 AM »

Too add another line of thinking here...what color is the mare? I once had a grey mare with swollen lymph nodes. It was thought to be a possible aspect of melanoma. Turns out the swelling eventually receded. I knew about melanoma nodules in the usual places, but the lymph swelling was news to me.
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Ginger
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« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2006, 04:03:17 PM »

   I almost hesitate to say it for fear to bring bad luck,but knock on wood, I've been lucky enough so far not to have had it at my house either.Everyone gets a strangles vaccine every spring though, rather I go to the doctor or not. Those of you who like to frequent sale barns need to keep this in mind as well, A vet told a friend of ours that the virus can literally stay in the ground for years, and that he never wears the same boots to his barn after he had been somewhere where there was sickness.

  Some horses bust open "Internally". ( not good )
   
  From what I understand, if they survive it on their initial illness, they cannot contract it again.

  I've had horses who like to scratch the bottom of their head, come up with wood spinters that become feastered knots?? (have to be lanced)

   Why take chances???  If you don't know for sure , find out-

            Let us know how things turn out-

                                               Ginger-

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Thunder530
Guest
« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2006, 06:41:39 PM »

hey all.  I haven't been on in a few days but did get my horse to the vet this week.  He looked him over pretty well.  He just feels like it is some residual from the sniffles he had earlier in the year.  Actually, if I think back, he has had some enlargement since probably March or April.  He really didn't think it was anything and definitely didn't think it was strangles.  My horse is a medicine hat cremello with blue eyes and that is why I wouldn't even be surprised to have heard that sunburn could contribute.  The vet said it could hang on for a little while yet and I will definitely be keeping an eye on it! I guess with enough horses between all of us, we'll eventually have heard of everything.
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GlideRide
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« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2006, 11:05:16 PM »

We had a virus hit two years ago that caused the lymph node swelling.  All the strangles cultures were negative (they were repeated several times) only 3 out of 30 horses came down with it (again not typical of strangles) and all of the  nodes burst outward.  Vet said it was a common cold virus....just a response to an above post, lymph nodes do serve as a filter in infection and how large they get is dependant on many things which equals to a very long explanation that won't make for entertaining reading.  They serve the same purpose in humans and anything from mild sinus infections to severe blood dyscrasias can cause enlargment.  It is always indicative of a problem though and should be checked out.
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walkinthewalk
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« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2006, 11:40:57 AM »

thunder530,  you didn't mention how old your horse is, so here's one more thing to consider if it is still young enough to be "teething".

If it is young and is having trouble losing its caps, the lumps might be from that.  I had that happen with a young horse and when I called the vet out, he explained it was a slight infection from the teething process.

When the equine dentist came out, HE said those "teething" lumps are because the caps aren't coming off, BUT the tooth is being forced down instead of up into the mouth and thus the lumps.  Once the caps are removed, the teeth then start to grow in the correct direction - up into the mouth.

Regardless, IMO, there is still cause for concern and perhaps getting a second veterinarian opinion might be prudent Smiley
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Thunder530
Guest
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2006, 04:46:53 PM »

The lumps initially appeared at about one year.  They are very faintly still there.  I feel for them every few days.  Its been at least 4-5 months now.  They have gone down but not completely gone.  I wish I could be more specific in what the vet said they could be caused from but he tried to assume me it was no cause for alarm.  I can definitely say this horse has always been "healthy as a horse" with the only exception being a traumatic gelding experience (I was definitely traumatized!!!).  I will ask the vet about his teeth.  I'm not opposed to a second opinion since I think any vet or doctor can get it wrong sometimes.
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Thunder530
Guest
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2006, 04:48:04 PM »

*assure me* I meant to say.  :chew:.
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