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Author Topic: Adams Horse & Mule Company  (Read 10634 times)
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Vanna
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« on: April 30, 2007, 03:36:05 AM »

Has anyone ever dealt with Adam's Horse & Mule Company in Kentucky?
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ashbfarm
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« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2007, 03:08:43 PM »

No but I am into mules.  I have seen them around a lot.  They seem to sell a lot of stock.  I havent heard bad things about them.  Sorry I am not much help but if you have mule questions I can try.  I am new to the board so their might be folks who are better versed in this on here but I will help however I can.  Smiley
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Vanna
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« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2007, 03:34:24 PM »

I am not a mule owner just yet...thanks for the reply.
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Sherry in CA
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« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2007, 04:36:16 PM »

I have not dealt with them, but heard of folks that have...good & bad.  Treat them as the dealers they are; not necessarily bad, but you need to be informed when considering their stock.
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lovehorses
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« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2007, 09:40:28 PM »

Hi,
I'm seriously thinking about buying a TW horse from Adams Horse and Mule Co.  So what are the good points and bad points.
I've seen a lot of comments stating nothing but good feedback.
Any help you can offer before I purchase a horse from them would be greatly appreciated.  Viewing their horses from the website is probably a lot different than seeing them in person.
Thanks  
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Sherry in CA
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« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2007, 11:22:17 AM »

Most horse dealers (them included) obtain horses for fairly cheap prices...put a minimum of training into them, then sell them at a much inflated price.  Adams DOES appear to have lot's of nice horses & I'm sure many of them are.  There prices are high though.  That's ok, if you see something you like and are willing to pay.  But like ANYWHERE you go to buy a horse (private, dealer, breeder, etc.), be wary & make sure you try them out AND get a good vet check.  If you don't consider yourself to be fairly experienced, take someone you know well & that you're sure has experience with you to look at the horse(s).  It doesn't mean they don't have THE horse for you, but just be smart about it (not snotty).  Good luck & have fun looking!!
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Dude Walkin
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« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2007, 06:00:22 PM »

 :sF:.
Hi there
I have dealt with Adams Horse & Mule Co. and I would highly recommend them.  I bought a horse from them last year and he is a real sweetheart.  I happen to luck out and bought a very laid back horse for which I paid a premium price.  I had gone to Kentucky and TN and went to several dealers and I was most impressed with Adams.  I live in Ontario, Canada so it was a long way to go to look at horses.  Turned out the horse I was intending to look at had been sold.  He showed me several different horses.  I stayed in the area for 3 days and was invited back each day to go for a ride or visit or whatever.  YES,,,,I think their prices are high, but I did get a vet check there and they trailered him for me, and they kept him at their stable for an extra 2 weeks until my friend could pick him up and got his shoes reset for me.  I am also new to gaited horses and I have only had one before this purchase.  I thought they were very honest and they try really hard to match horse and rider.

Connie

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lovehorses
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« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2007, 08:41:15 PM »

Hi,
Thank you both for your great responses.
I have been looking for a long time and for me their horses look great for the money.  I was also wondering how old your horse is when you bought one.  I would consider myself an intermediate rider and was curious if they are as calm as stated on the website.  I am a litle leary about a young horse.  Also, how was the cost of the transportation they arranged for you?  I have gotten three quotes so far from different transportation companies.  I live inbetween San Francisco and San Jose, California.  How much was the vet check and did you just call one from the directory, in the area?  I know I'm asking a lot of questions but I like to do my homework first.  Are the colors of the horses pretty close to how they are presented on their website.
Any info is greatly appreciated.
Thank you
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Vanna
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« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2007, 06:45:35 AM »

If these are Registered TWH I would seriously recommend calling the TWHBEA registration department.  Ask for the name and address of the last listed owner on the horse's papers, go to the white pages on the Internet and look up their phone number.  CALL the previous owner and find out what they will share about the horse...there is always a reason they sold him/her.  I have avoided some disasters this way.

Young horses will stay in gait and well behaved if they are ridden consistently (provided they have the temperment and talent to do so). BUT if you do not consistently work these young horses they may not stay they way you see them now.  I have had several of these type horses from another sales company in that area and I would caution you to do your homework and make some phone calls.

Ask Adams Horse & Mule where they bought the horse...most likely they will tell you "I don't remember." Read between the lines on this and be very careful.
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dotsandspotsranch
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« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2007, 11:39:06 AM »

Hi
I just want to add this is nothing against any horse dealers in particular and I am sure that not everyone is the same. But I have first hand experience in dealing with several.
I am originally from CA. I live in KY now.
When I was in CA. Me and several of my friends bought gaited horses over the internet from Horse Dealers.
What I have seen is they arrive in VERY poor health.
They have very LITTLE training at all.
You can get on them and they are taught to just gait in a straight line. They don't stop, back up, turn, side pass
or do much else.
Most of the time they have some kind of trust "issue" from poor or little handling.
Now that I am in KY. I can tell you,
They buy them from the stock yards for $100 to $1000 each.
They sell them for huge prices with no training.
Do not buy a horse that you have not personally ridden.
My friend has bought 3 horses over the internet and none of them worked out for her.
One of the horses she bought had the wrong papers.
It was a completly differnt horse then what was on the paperwork. If its a gelding and spotted they will just grab a set of papers out of the drawer that look like they match and sell it with those.
The gaited breeds don't put a picture on the papers like some of the other bred registries do.
Yes, there are some good ones out there but I am just telling you the facts as I know them.
Try to buy from a private party and ride the horse first.
I can go out and look at horses in KY for people. Take photos and ride etc.
Let me know if you are intersted in that.
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lovehorses
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« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2007, 10:01:29 PM »

Hi dotsandspotsranch,
Thank you for your email and your great advice.
I would really like to discuss further your offer in regards to checking out a horse for me in Kentucky.  Please send me an email vnvaldes@comcast.net so we can possibly figure out how this will work.
Sounds like maybe we can put this together.
lovehorses
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Donna
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« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2007, 11:50:45 PM »

I just browsed their website and, for what it's worth, here's my "take" on it.
Seems they have a huge volume of horses coming in on a regular basis, and going out.  
The horses they sell have been picked up at auctions, divorce situations, "fire sales",....etc. for a nominal price by "buyers" that scout the horse markets for them.
The horses are then put through "boot camp" training. Two months of hard, disciplined, daily riding with (possibly)heavy hands and harsh bits (notice the length of shanks).
If you notice, all of these horses travel in the same body frame.  Cranked, flexed, driven forward with spurs by a heavy guy.

These horses are worked, and worked HARD, so that whoever rides them won't have a bit of trouble with them.

Yep, they're in great shape, and well fed, and they look pretty, but do you really want to pay $5,000.00 for an unregistered horse?  Or $10,000.00 for a palomino gelding?

 I'm not opposed to someone making a living off of buying and selling, and I'm sure there are lots of satisfied customers out there, but, you are paying TOP dollar.

What you ARE paying for is a bit of insurance that the horse you buy works for you. A guarantee that you won't be "stuck" with what you picked.

 At these prices, a horse that does not work for one person, will probably be replaced with one that does.

Not too bad of a deal if you have the money to throw their way.
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Malda
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« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2007, 08:21:36 PM »

I've looked at that site. In So. California, 5,000 is pretty average for a gaited horse, with or without papers. And Adams seems to have better quality horses than we get out here, take a look at J. Walker Ranch. I was wondering how many of those horses were former show/big lick horses? Seems like some of them have had their tails cut by the way they're holding the tail up as they move and how far they can move it around.


Erin
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Ginger
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« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2007, 10:34:17 PM »

   I just wanted to comment on the statement about some gaited papers.

   I have been registering SSH's for many years now, and I was never able to do this without Identification photos.
They also require an inspector approved by the association to view horse, and sign papers.(SSHBEA). It's true that the photos are not on the actual registration certificate, however the color and all markings ARE. They are carefully written out in word form.

  I have also registered a few walking colts. Their requirments are similar, but they also require blood typeing. If you buy a walking horse, there should be a small slip of paper included with registration papers(bloodtype). Being that they already have the mare and stallion's bloodtype on record, it's not hard to determine if the colts blood is legit.

  I would have been more afraid of getting wrong papers on a Walking horse ( or other solid horse), in years past, than I would a spotted.It would be easy for instance if you had a black horse with a blaze, to transfer those papers to another black horse with a blaze.

  Don't get me wrong, I don't put it past someone doing this....

 I think that Sherry put it best...treat them like the dealers that they are, and BE INFORMED.

  Just to put a bug in your ear, anyone who is looking for a horse, and has the ability to travel, would be likely to run up on a good deal here in Tennessee this year. Especially intermediates who can finish out a green horse.(I think dead broke horses are expensive anywhere.)

Anyway, Drought has made hay expensive, and some pastures aren't looking so hot. Those with large #'s will likely downsize before winter.  Not that I think anyone will be giving them away, but there might be something for sale at a good price, that otherwise wouldn't be for sale at all.

                        Best wishes!!!

                                 Ginger-



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aarpaso
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« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2007, 01:01:04 PM »

                  :sF:.

   have a checked out Agdirect.it has some nice gaited horses listed.
aarpaso
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